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The Biggest Wedding Trends in Every Decade Since 1900

The Biggest Wedding Trends in Every Decade Since 1900



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Wait until you hear about a 1980s wedding cake

Travel through time with these wedding trends.

Like most things in the world of entertaining, trends in wedding planning are constantly evolving. Things that were all the rage even just 10 years ago are seen as outdated and even a little bit strange today. And we’re not even talking about your mom’s puffy sleeves and big hair from the 1980s, we’re also talking about things from just last decade — remember cupcake towers instead of a tiered wedding cake?

For the Biggest Wedding Trends in Every Decade Since 1900 Slideshow, click here.

Everything from wedding cakes to what flowers are in vogue to how (and where) wedding ceremonies are held has completely changed since the 1900s. Even just 30 years ago, a sleeveless wedding dress wouldn’t have been considered remotely appropriate, but it’s the norm today.

We’re not just talking about bridal fashions here, either. (Though bridal fashions do play an important role in the overall aesthetic of a wedding.) Everything about a wedding, from how (and where) a ceremony and reception is held to the vows to the desserts and flowers evolves from decade to decade. And though each and every bride today may try to customize her wedding to the very last detail to create a deeply personal experience, she may not even know that she’s actually falling into the biggest wedding trend of the modern era. Don’t believe us? Click here to check out the biggest wedding trends from every decade since the 1900s.


  • The Great British Bake Off final expects to draw an audience of over 4 million tonight
  • 27% of Britons say they will bake more in the next year
  • National Baking Week runs 15th -21st October
  • Baking is most popular in Yorkshire
  • 1 in 7 adults bake at least twice a week

Published: 15:29 BST, 16 October 2012 | Updated: 12:11 BST, 10 September 2013

Tonight's grand final of the Great British Bake Off is expected to draw over four million viewers. Not bad for a genteel BBC2 show about cakes.

The show has become one of BBC2’s biggest success stories with a peak of 4.6 million tuning in each week to see presenters Sue Perkins and Mel Giedroyc and judges Paul Hollywood and Mary Berry whip up a TV storm.

The show has been credited with making baking cool again, and reminding boys where the kitchen is (tonight's final is all male and judge Paul Hollywood's heartthrob status continues to soar). But Brtiain's love of baking isn't really new at all - just ask your grandmother.

The trend for home baking has been in and out of vogue many times over the last century

From the launch of Good Housekeeping magazine in the 1920s to the introduction of TV chefs post-Coronation in the 1950s, the last century has seen the popularity of baking rise and fall according to social and economic trends.

Today's thrifty climate means that we are enjoying home comforts as well as needing to stretch our bank accounts while in the 1930s the increasing popularity of cars and therefore picnics caused a boom in baking, and in the 1980s celebrity chef Delia Smith stirred our passions for the kitchen with her 'How to Cook' book.


  • The Great British Bake Off final expects to draw an audience of over 4 million tonight
  • 27% of Britons say they will bake more in the next year
  • National Baking Week runs 15th -21st October
  • Baking is most popular in Yorkshire
  • 1 in 7 adults bake at least twice a week

Published: 15:29 BST, 16 October 2012 | Updated: 12:11 BST, 10 September 2013

Tonight's grand final of the Great British Bake Off is expected to draw over four million viewers. Not bad for a genteel BBC2 show about cakes.

The show has become one of BBC2’s biggest success stories with a peak of 4.6 million tuning in each week to see presenters Sue Perkins and Mel Giedroyc and judges Paul Hollywood and Mary Berry whip up a TV storm.

The show has been credited with making baking cool again, and reminding boys where the kitchen is (tonight's final is all male and judge Paul Hollywood's heartthrob status continues to soar). But Brtiain's love of baking isn't really new at all - just ask your grandmother.

The trend for home baking has been in and out of vogue many times over the last century

From the launch of Good Housekeeping magazine in the 1920s to the introduction of TV chefs post-Coronation in the 1950s, the last century has seen the popularity of baking rise and fall according to social and economic trends.

Today's thrifty climate means that we are enjoying home comforts as well as needing to stretch our bank accounts while in the 1930s the increasing popularity of cars and therefore picnics caused a boom in baking, and in the 1980s celebrity chef Delia Smith stirred our passions for the kitchen with her 'How to Cook' book.


  • The Great British Bake Off final expects to draw an audience of over 4 million tonight
  • 27% of Britons say they will bake more in the next year
  • National Baking Week runs 15th -21st October
  • Baking is most popular in Yorkshire
  • 1 in 7 adults bake at least twice a week

Published: 15:29 BST, 16 October 2012 | Updated: 12:11 BST, 10 September 2013

Tonight's grand final of the Great British Bake Off is expected to draw over four million viewers. Not bad for a genteel BBC2 show about cakes.

The show has become one of BBC2’s biggest success stories with a peak of 4.6 million tuning in each week to see presenters Sue Perkins and Mel Giedroyc and judges Paul Hollywood and Mary Berry whip up a TV storm.

The show has been credited with making baking cool again, and reminding boys where the kitchen is (tonight's final is all male and judge Paul Hollywood's heartthrob status continues to soar). But Brtiain's love of baking isn't really new at all - just ask your grandmother.

The trend for home baking has been in and out of vogue many times over the last century

From the launch of Good Housekeeping magazine in the 1920s to the introduction of TV chefs post-Coronation in the 1950s, the last century has seen the popularity of baking rise and fall according to social and economic trends.

Today's thrifty climate means that we are enjoying home comforts as well as needing to stretch our bank accounts while in the 1930s the increasing popularity of cars and therefore picnics caused a boom in baking, and in the 1980s celebrity chef Delia Smith stirred our passions for the kitchen with her 'How to Cook' book.


  • The Great British Bake Off final expects to draw an audience of over 4 million tonight
  • 27% of Britons say they will bake more in the next year
  • National Baking Week runs 15th -21st October
  • Baking is most popular in Yorkshire
  • 1 in 7 adults bake at least twice a week

Published: 15:29 BST, 16 October 2012 | Updated: 12:11 BST, 10 September 2013

Tonight's grand final of the Great British Bake Off is expected to draw over four million viewers. Not bad for a genteel BBC2 show about cakes.

The show has become one of BBC2’s biggest success stories with a peak of 4.6 million tuning in each week to see presenters Sue Perkins and Mel Giedroyc and judges Paul Hollywood and Mary Berry whip up a TV storm.

The show has been credited with making baking cool again, and reminding boys where the kitchen is (tonight's final is all male and judge Paul Hollywood's heartthrob status continues to soar). But Brtiain's love of baking isn't really new at all - just ask your grandmother.

The trend for home baking has been in and out of vogue many times over the last century

From the launch of Good Housekeeping magazine in the 1920s to the introduction of TV chefs post-Coronation in the 1950s, the last century has seen the popularity of baking rise and fall according to social and economic trends.

Today's thrifty climate means that we are enjoying home comforts as well as needing to stretch our bank accounts while in the 1930s the increasing popularity of cars and therefore picnics caused a boom in baking, and in the 1980s celebrity chef Delia Smith stirred our passions for the kitchen with her 'How to Cook' book.


  • The Great British Bake Off final expects to draw an audience of over 4 million tonight
  • 27% of Britons say they will bake more in the next year
  • National Baking Week runs 15th -21st October
  • Baking is most popular in Yorkshire
  • 1 in 7 adults bake at least twice a week

Published: 15:29 BST, 16 October 2012 | Updated: 12:11 BST, 10 September 2013

Tonight's grand final of the Great British Bake Off is expected to draw over four million viewers. Not bad for a genteel BBC2 show about cakes.

The show has become one of BBC2’s biggest success stories with a peak of 4.6 million tuning in each week to see presenters Sue Perkins and Mel Giedroyc and judges Paul Hollywood and Mary Berry whip up a TV storm.

The show has been credited with making baking cool again, and reminding boys where the kitchen is (tonight's final is all male and judge Paul Hollywood's heartthrob status continues to soar). But Brtiain's love of baking isn't really new at all - just ask your grandmother.

The trend for home baking has been in and out of vogue many times over the last century

From the launch of Good Housekeeping magazine in the 1920s to the introduction of TV chefs post-Coronation in the 1950s, the last century has seen the popularity of baking rise and fall according to social and economic trends.

Today's thrifty climate means that we are enjoying home comforts as well as needing to stretch our bank accounts while in the 1930s the increasing popularity of cars and therefore picnics caused a boom in baking, and in the 1980s celebrity chef Delia Smith stirred our passions for the kitchen with her 'How to Cook' book.


  • The Great British Bake Off final expects to draw an audience of over 4 million tonight
  • 27% of Britons say they will bake more in the next year
  • National Baking Week runs 15th -21st October
  • Baking is most popular in Yorkshire
  • 1 in 7 adults bake at least twice a week

Published: 15:29 BST, 16 October 2012 | Updated: 12:11 BST, 10 September 2013

Tonight's grand final of the Great British Bake Off is expected to draw over four million viewers. Not bad for a genteel BBC2 show about cakes.

The show has become one of BBC2’s biggest success stories with a peak of 4.6 million tuning in each week to see presenters Sue Perkins and Mel Giedroyc and judges Paul Hollywood and Mary Berry whip up a TV storm.

The show has been credited with making baking cool again, and reminding boys where the kitchen is (tonight's final is all male and judge Paul Hollywood's heartthrob status continues to soar). But Brtiain's love of baking isn't really new at all - just ask your grandmother.

The trend for home baking has been in and out of vogue many times over the last century

From the launch of Good Housekeeping magazine in the 1920s to the introduction of TV chefs post-Coronation in the 1950s, the last century has seen the popularity of baking rise and fall according to social and economic trends.

Today's thrifty climate means that we are enjoying home comforts as well as needing to stretch our bank accounts while in the 1930s the increasing popularity of cars and therefore picnics caused a boom in baking, and in the 1980s celebrity chef Delia Smith stirred our passions for the kitchen with her 'How to Cook' book.


  • The Great British Bake Off final expects to draw an audience of over 4 million tonight
  • 27% of Britons say they will bake more in the next year
  • National Baking Week runs 15th -21st October
  • Baking is most popular in Yorkshire
  • 1 in 7 adults bake at least twice a week

Published: 15:29 BST, 16 October 2012 | Updated: 12:11 BST, 10 September 2013

Tonight's grand final of the Great British Bake Off is expected to draw over four million viewers. Not bad for a genteel BBC2 show about cakes.

The show has become one of BBC2’s biggest success stories with a peak of 4.6 million tuning in each week to see presenters Sue Perkins and Mel Giedroyc and judges Paul Hollywood and Mary Berry whip up a TV storm.

The show has been credited with making baking cool again, and reminding boys where the kitchen is (tonight's final is all male and judge Paul Hollywood's heartthrob status continues to soar). But Brtiain's love of baking isn't really new at all - just ask your grandmother.

The trend for home baking has been in and out of vogue many times over the last century

From the launch of Good Housekeeping magazine in the 1920s to the introduction of TV chefs post-Coronation in the 1950s, the last century has seen the popularity of baking rise and fall according to social and economic trends.

Today's thrifty climate means that we are enjoying home comforts as well as needing to stretch our bank accounts while in the 1930s the increasing popularity of cars and therefore picnics caused a boom in baking, and in the 1980s celebrity chef Delia Smith stirred our passions for the kitchen with her 'How to Cook' book.


  • The Great British Bake Off final expects to draw an audience of over 4 million tonight
  • 27% of Britons say they will bake more in the next year
  • National Baking Week runs 15th -21st October
  • Baking is most popular in Yorkshire
  • 1 in 7 adults bake at least twice a week

Published: 15:29 BST, 16 October 2012 | Updated: 12:11 BST, 10 September 2013

Tonight's grand final of the Great British Bake Off is expected to draw over four million viewers. Not bad for a genteel BBC2 show about cakes.

The show has become one of BBC2’s biggest success stories with a peak of 4.6 million tuning in each week to see presenters Sue Perkins and Mel Giedroyc and judges Paul Hollywood and Mary Berry whip up a TV storm.

The show has been credited with making baking cool again, and reminding boys where the kitchen is (tonight's final is all male and judge Paul Hollywood's heartthrob status continues to soar). But Brtiain's love of baking isn't really new at all - just ask your grandmother.

The trend for home baking has been in and out of vogue many times over the last century

From the launch of Good Housekeeping magazine in the 1920s to the introduction of TV chefs post-Coronation in the 1950s, the last century has seen the popularity of baking rise and fall according to social and economic trends.

Today's thrifty climate means that we are enjoying home comforts as well as needing to stretch our bank accounts while in the 1930s the increasing popularity of cars and therefore picnics caused a boom in baking, and in the 1980s celebrity chef Delia Smith stirred our passions for the kitchen with her 'How to Cook' book.


  • The Great British Bake Off final expects to draw an audience of over 4 million tonight
  • 27% of Britons say they will bake more in the next year
  • National Baking Week runs 15th -21st October
  • Baking is most popular in Yorkshire
  • 1 in 7 adults bake at least twice a week

Published: 15:29 BST, 16 October 2012 | Updated: 12:11 BST, 10 September 2013

Tonight's grand final of the Great British Bake Off is expected to draw over four million viewers. Not bad for a genteel BBC2 show about cakes.

The show has become one of BBC2’s biggest success stories with a peak of 4.6 million tuning in each week to see presenters Sue Perkins and Mel Giedroyc and judges Paul Hollywood and Mary Berry whip up a TV storm.

The show has been credited with making baking cool again, and reminding boys where the kitchen is (tonight's final is all male and judge Paul Hollywood's heartthrob status continues to soar). But Brtiain's love of baking isn't really new at all - just ask your grandmother.

The trend for home baking has been in and out of vogue many times over the last century

From the launch of Good Housekeeping magazine in the 1920s to the introduction of TV chefs post-Coronation in the 1950s, the last century has seen the popularity of baking rise and fall according to social and economic trends.

Today's thrifty climate means that we are enjoying home comforts as well as needing to stretch our bank accounts while in the 1930s the increasing popularity of cars and therefore picnics caused a boom in baking, and in the 1980s celebrity chef Delia Smith stirred our passions for the kitchen with her 'How to Cook' book.


  • The Great British Bake Off final expects to draw an audience of over 4 million tonight
  • 27% of Britons say they will bake more in the next year
  • National Baking Week runs 15th -21st October
  • Baking is most popular in Yorkshire
  • 1 in 7 adults bake at least twice a week

Published: 15:29 BST, 16 October 2012 | Updated: 12:11 BST, 10 September 2013

Tonight's grand final of the Great British Bake Off is expected to draw over four million viewers. Not bad for a genteel BBC2 show about cakes.

The show has become one of BBC2’s biggest success stories with a peak of 4.6 million tuning in each week to see presenters Sue Perkins and Mel Giedroyc and judges Paul Hollywood and Mary Berry whip up a TV storm.

The show has been credited with making baking cool again, and reminding boys where the kitchen is (tonight's final is all male and judge Paul Hollywood's heartthrob status continues to soar). But Brtiain's love of baking isn't really new at all - just ask your grandmother.

The trend for home baking has been in and out of vogue many times over the last century

From the launch of Good Housekeeping magazine in the 1920s to the introduction of TV chefs post-Coronation in the 1950s, the last century has seen the popularity of baking rise and fall according to social and economic trends.

Today's thrifty climate means that we are enjoying home comforts as well as needing to stretch our bank accounts while in the 1930s the increasing popularity of cars and therefore picnics caused a boom in baking, and in the 1980s celebrity chef Delia Smith stirred our passions for the kitchen with her 'How to Cook' book.