Cocktail Recipes, Spirits, and Local Bars

Cornmeal and Fig Cake with Pine Nuts

Cornmeal and Fig Cake with Pine Nuts


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup polenta (coarse cornmeal; do not use instant)
  • 1/2 cup diced dried Calimyrna figs (about 6)
  • 1 tablespoon fennel seeds

Recipe Preparation

  • Preheat oven to 375°F. Butter 8-inch-diameter cake pan with 2-inch-high sides. Beat egg yolks and sugar in large bowl. Bring milk, grappa, and salt to boil in heavy medium saucepan over medium heat. Gradually whisk hot milk mixture into egg yolk mixture. Return to saucepan. Whisk in polenta. Whisk over medium-high heat until mixture thickens and begins to bubble, about 8 minutes.

  • Fold figs, raisins, pine nuts, and fennel seeds into polenta mixture. Pour into prepared cake pan.

  • Bake cake until golden brown, set in center, and beginning to pull away from sides of pan, about 40 minutes. Cool in pan 20 minutes. Cut around pan sides and invert cake onto platter. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Reviews Section

Stacey Snacks

Hi, I'm Stacey, and I'm a FIG-AHOLIC.

So now you know that I have an addition to figs.
Big deal, there are worse things one can be addicted to, like apples or something like that.

I am always searching for the best fig cake (I loved the fig cake I made last time with the olive oil) and will be making the big bundt w/ buttermilk and preserved figs soon.

This cake rivals up there with the excellent ones.

It is a delicious Venetian dessert made with polenta instead of flour, so the gluten free thing is nice for people who can't have wheat.
There is also no butter in this recipe.

The fennel seeds w/ the figs and cornmeal were a beautiful combination, just right served with some Vin Santo for dessert.

This is not a dessert for everyone.
It's almost like a firm bread pudding, because there is no flour and no egg whites. It was very special, it almost felt like we were transported to Venice for the evening. (I wish).

I will print the original recipe from Bon Appetit 2005, however I made some changes.

I substituted the grappa for cognac. Why? Because grappa tastes like lighter fluid to me (not that I have ever sampled lighter fluid) and it is also way too expensive to purchase just for one recipe. The cognac worked out just fine. Any good cognac will do, Hennessy, Courvossier or E&J works too. Don't leave it out.

I also added more figs than called for. Why only 6 figs? I added about 12 dried figs.

One last note: you have to work fast with this cake. The milk and cognac started to boil over and I freaked, but saved it (luckily I have a small kitchen and can just turn and reach for the pot!) in time. Also you have to do a lot of quick whisking.
Just warning you. But I promise it will be worth the effort.

Polenta & Fig Cake w/ Fennel & Pignoli Nuts (adapted from Bon Appetit)

4 large egg yolks
2/3 cup sugar

2 cups of whole milk
1/4 cup grappa (I used cognac)
1/8 tsp salt

1/2 cup polenta (or coarse cornmeal)

1/2 cup dried figs, chopped (I used about 12 figs)
1/3 cup raisins
1/4 cup of pine nuts
1 Tbsp fennel seeds

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
Butter an 8" cake pan with 2" sides liberally with melted butter, using a brush.

Beat egg yolks and sugar in a large bowl.

Bring milk, grappa or cognac & salt to a boil in a heavy saucepan on medium heat (be careful, the milk started to boil over).

Working quickly, whisk the hot milk & cognac into your bowl with the egg yolk/sugar mixture. Whisk so the eggs don't cook in the hot milk.
Return the contents of the bowl to the saucepan.

Whisk in polenta, and whisk over medium low heat until the polenta starts to thicken, about 5-7 minutes. Keep whisking!

Turn off heat and fold in figs, raisins, nuts, and fennel seeds. Pour into prepared cake pan and bake 40 minutes until golden brown and starts to pull away from the sides of the pan.


Grappa Infused Italian Polenta Shortcake

Shutterstock: MShev

A recent cooking class got me thinking out of the box (which is always good) as one of the participants was allergic to cow dairy. No butter, milk, cow cheese or cream. The savory dishes were easy, a cheese-free Risotto with salmon, roasted chicken, arancini stuffed with goat cheese and mushrooms, and a salad. But the dessert gave me a bit of a pause. I could have substituted lard for butter in a pie crust or cake, but I wanted to use this opportunity to find something a little different. Then I remembered a dessert based on polenta that we had planned for our cooking classes on our last Italy tour. We didn’t quite get around to it on our trip, but here was a great opportunity to try it out.

Polenta is a staple in Northern Italy, replacing pasta in some regions as the most popular starch. For hundreds years, the residents of these northern regions literally survived on this staple. You will see it served as a soft ‘mush’ as a side dish to meats, and then the leftovers allowed to harden and later served grilled, or topped with cheese and sopressatta and broiled. In the recipe that follows, leftover soft polenta is combined with dried fruits and nuts, and baked as a shortcake.

Originally, polenta was made with a variety of grains, millet, spelt, and eventually buckwheat. Corn, or maize, was unknown in Italy until it made its way there from North America in the 15th and 16th centuries. The Spanish and Portuguese ships traveling from the Caribbean to Europe would bury their treasures and gold in flint corn to hide it from pirates. This new grain was easier to cultivate and had higher yields than the traditional grains, making it much less expensive to produce, so these other grains soon took a back seat to maize as the grain of choice.

Today, we see many fields of corn as we explore the Veneto by bike or foot. What we don’t see, however, is fresh corn on the cob at mealtime. The corn cultivated there is used for either animal fodder, or dried and ground into meal for polenta. Cornmeal can be stored for a long time, and so historically would have been how corn was incorporated into the cuisine before modern techniques such as freezing and refrigeration.

Rethink Chicken Into your Picnic Pecking Order

This recipe is based on Marcella Hazan’s recipe from her classic cookbook, Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking. In her book, she mentions that James Beard became fascinated with this particular dessert during a stay in Venice, and asked Marcella to provide the recipe. The addition of dried fruits and nuts reflects Venice’s role for hundreds of years as the crossroads of trade between Europe and the Near East.

I took the liberty of adding a bit of the favorite local digestif, grappa, to give it a bit of a kick. A nice sweet Torcolato dessert wine from Breganze would make a nice accompaniment.


“A Late August Four-Letter “F” Word To Savor!”

My favorite four letter “f” word in late August is “Figs”. Finally we have some figs to play with. I have been watching the trees in the neighborhood, snooping around the farmer’s markets, just waiting, thinking on simple recipes using tree ripened figs.

“Brown Turkey Figs”

Sitting with a group of food friends the other day we started talking about foods we really were not aware of when we were younger, foods that we now know and love. For most of us Southerners it seems fresh figs just didn’t make it onto our radars until adulthood. I am not sure why. Fig trees thrive around here so it seems that figs would have been a summer staple just like peaches & late summer pears. I think I will do a bit of research to figure out why I never ate fresh figs as a child. As an adult I relish the arrival of this little, lush four-letter word.

“Fresh Figs-Pine Nuts Cornmeal Upside-Down Cake”

The corn meal gives it a bit of a crunch as do the pine nuts. The caramelized fig topping drizzled with maple syrup is luscious.

Ingredients: 5 to 6 fresh figs, 2 to 3 cups self-rising white or yellow cornmeal (I used gluten-free) 1 tsp ground cardamom 1 stick good butter (Kerry gold of course!) 1 cup brown sugar (divided into two 1/2 cups 1/4 cups toasted pine nuts 2 eggs milk real maple syrup

Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Melt butter in a cast iron skillet, preferably, over medium high heat. Add in 1/2 cup brown sugar stirring until melted.

2. Wash & dry figs. Cut each one in half lengthwise. Place cut-side down in skillet in a circular pattern. Sprinkle toasted pine nuts over figs. Turn heat to low allowing the figs to caramelize somewhat for about 5-8 minutes.

3. Meanwhile in a mixing bowl whisk together the dry ingredients..cornmeal, second 1/2 cup brown sugar & cardamom. Add eggs & enough milk to make a batter.

4. Pour/scrape batter into the hot skillet with the figs on top of the stove. Transfer skillet to the pre-heated oven. Bake for about 20-30 minutes until cake is golden brown and set in the middle. Remove skillet from oven and let rest for about 5 minutes.

5. Place a plate over the top of the skillet and “flip” plate & skillet upside-down. Scrape any caramel left in the pan over the top of the cake. While cake is still hot drizzle generously with real maple syrup. Cool cake for at least 10 minutes before cutting. Serve slices with additional maple syrup on side if desired.


Bonus Recipe: “Figgy Pancakes”

Ingredients: Same as for the cake recipe with a few extra figs quartered.

It was morning when I was baking the cake and had a bit of batter left over after filling the skillet. While the cake was baking I whipped up some pancakes for breakfast!

Directions: 1. Heat some butter in a small non-stick pan or griddle over high heat. Add a few quartered figs.

2. Pour in batter. When batter is set on bottom and bubbly on top flip pancake and finish cooking til golden brown.

3. Serve immediately with real maple syrup. This was one good pancake recipe!

EXTRA, EXTRA BONUS RECIPE…SEE BELOW…THE EASIEST MOST DELICIOUS WAY TO EAT FRESH FIGS…….DON’T MISS THIS ONE!

“Sea Salt & Raw Sugar Dipped Figs”

Take some wonderful fresh figs. Cut them into quarters. Sprinkle some great sea salt & raw sugar on a saucer. Dip cut edges of figs in salt-sugar mixture and eat.

Doesn’t the word “fig” conjure up an image of Adam romping around in the Garden of Eden wearing a fig leaf?

I wondered what figs would be like after they were frozen?

FYI. Mushy, but aren’t they pretty frozen?

Some “f” word music I like. A little bit different, fun and peppy to help you get figgy.

Album, “The Figs”, The Figs, 2007 Valcour Records

Album, “What Keeps Me Up At Night”, The Figs 2008

Songs, “Jumbo” & “The Long Goodbye”, Marseille Figs, 2009 Figs of London


Fried Polenta Cakes recipes

Homemade crispy calamari is quick, easy and definitely worth the effort. Dip into creamy gar. ( more )

Preparation method For the mayonnaise, mix all the ingredients together and set aside. For. ( more )

Prep: 10m Cook: 15m Servs: 4

I am wondering what we have for dinner. fast thinking open the refrigerator & Wo-la. see . ( more )

in a large bowl combine all the ingredient. mix.. & portion as you like . 4 1/4 lb pork bur. ( more )

this simple recipe is from bon appetit 5/05 ( more )

preheat oven to 375. grease an 8&quot cake pan. beat yolks and sugar in a large bowl. in . ( more )

This is breakfast cake with an interesting texture since it contains both olive oil and corn. ( more )

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Cut the orage into quarters, and place into a food processer. ( more )

"This no-bake chocolate dessert from Rhonda Lanterman of Terrace, British Columbia has a tas. ( more )

Set aside 1 tablespoon almonds for garnish. Chop remaining almonds sprinkle into a greased . ( more )

"This is a moist spice cake with a 'secret' ingredient. They will never guess!" ( more )

Stir together flour, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt. In a mixing bowl, combi. ( more )

Prep: 20m Cook: 30m Servs: 18

I'm a Southern girl what can I say? Even if you don't like grits, these just might get to . ( more )

Bring water, 2 cups of the half-half, and salt to a boil in a large saucepan over medium he. ( more )

Prep: 30m Cook: 30m Servs: 8


Notes about this recipe

Member Rating

Categories

Where’s the full recipe - why can I only see the ingredients?

At Eat Your Books we love great recipes – and the best come from chefs, authors and bloggers who have spent time developing and testing them.

We’ve helped you locate this recipe but for the full instructions you need to go to its original source.

If the recipe is available online - click the link “View complete recipe”– if not, you do need to own the cookbook or magazine.


The answer is simple, Simplicity, Foolproof, Straightforward, and Tested. Yes, all recipes have been tested before posting including this Thyme-fig Fruitcake.

Ready to make this Thyme-fig Fruitcake Recipe? Let’s do it!

Oh, before I forget…If you’re looking for recipes that are simple to follow, then we’ve got your back. With over 55,000 recipes in our database, we’ve got the best recipes you’re craving for.

1/2 c Unsweetened apple juice 1/4 ts Baking soda
1/2 ts Dried thyme 6 tb Vegetable oil
1 c Finely chopped dried figs 2 tb Sugar
1 1/4 c Flour 1 Egg
1/4 c Cornmeal 1/4 c Pine nuts, toasted
2 ts Baking powder

Combine the apple juice, thyme, and figs in a bowl. Set aside for 10
minutes. Stir together the flour, cornmeal, baking powder, and
baking soda in a bowl.

Beat the oil, sugar and egg until well blended. Pour the egg mixture
into the flour. Add the pine nuts and fig mixture. Beat well.

Pour the batter into an oiled and floured 9-inch round (or 8 inch
square) baking pan. Bake in 350 F oven for 40 to 50 minutes. Cool
for 5 minutes in the pan. Remove from pan and cool thoroughly.

1/12 recipe – 190 calories, 1 bread, 1 fruit, 1 1/2 fat exchange 27
grams carbohydrate, 3 grams protein, 8 grams fat 66 mg sodium, 156 mg
potassium, 23 mg cholesterol


“A Late August Four-Letter “F” Word To Savor!”

My favorite four letter “f” word in late August is “Figs”. Finally we have some figs to play with. I have been watching the trees in the neighborhood, snooping around the farmer’s markets, just waiting, thinking on simple recipes using tree ripened figs.

“Brown Turkey Figs”

Sitting with a group of food friends the other day we started talking about foods we really were not aware of when we were younger, foods that we now know and love. For most of us Southerners it seems fresh figs just didn’t make it onto our radars until adulthood. I am not sure why. Fig trees thrive around here so it seems that figs would have been a summer staple just like peaches & late summer pears. I think I will do a bit of research to figure out why I never ate fresh figs as a child. As an adult I relish the arrival of this little, lush four-letter word.

“Fresh Figs-Pine Nuts Cornmeal Upside-Down Cake”

The corn meal gives it a bit of a crunch as do the pine nuts. The caramelized fig topping drizzled with maple syrup is luscious.

Ingredients: 5 to 6 fresh figs, 2 to 3 cups self-rising white or yellow cornmeal (I used gluten-free) 1 tsp ground cardamom 1 stick good butter (Kerry gold of course!) 1 cup brown sugar (divided into two 1/2 cups 1/4 cups toasted pine nuts 2 eggs milk real maple syrup

Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Melt butter in a cast iron skillet, preferably, over medium high heat. Add in 1/2 cup brown sugar stirring until melted.

2. Wash & dry figs. Cut each one in half lengthwise. Place cut-side down in skillet in a circular pattern. Sprinkle toasted pine nuts over figs. Turn heat to low allowing the figs to caramelize somewhat for about 5-8 minutes.

3. Meanwhile in a mixing bowl whisk together the dry ingredients..cornmeal, second 1/2 cup brown sugar & cardamom. Add eggs & enough milk to make a batter.

4. Pour/scrape batter into the hot skillet with the figs on top of the stove. Transfer skillet to the pre-heated oven. Bake for about 20-30 minutes until cake is golden brown and set in the middle. Remove skillet from oven and let rest for about 5 minutes.

5. Place a plate over the top of the skillet and “flip” plate & skillet upside-down. Scrape any caramel left in the pan over the top of the cake. While cake is still hot drizzle generously with real maple syrup. Cool cake for at least 10 minutes before cutting. Serve slices with additional maple syrup on side if desired.


Bonus Recipe: “Figgy Pancakes”

Ingredients: Same as for the cake recipe with a few extra figs quartered.

It was morning when I was baking the cake and had a bit of batter left over after filling the skillet. While the cake was baking I whipped up some pancakes for breakfast!

Directions: 1. Heat some butter in a small non-stick pan or griddle over high heat. Add a few quartered figs.

2. Pour in batter. When batter is set on bottom and bubbly on top flip pancake and finish cooking til golden brown.

3. Serve immediately with real maple syrup. This was one good pancake recipe!

EXTRA, EXTRA BONUS RECIPE…SEE BELOW…THE EASIEST MOST DELICIOUS WAY TO EAT FRESH FIGS…….DON’T MISS THIS ONE!

“Sea Salt & Raw Sugar Dipped Figs”

Take some wonderful fresh figs. Cut them into quarters. Sprinkle some great sea salt & raw sugar on a saucer. Dip cut edges of figs in salt-sugar mixture and eat.

Doesn’t the word “fig” conjure up an image of Adam romping around in the Garden of Eden wearing a fig leaf?

I wondered what figs would be like after they were frozen?

FYI. Mushy, but aren’t they pretty frozen?

Some “f” word music I like. A little bit different, fun and peppy to help you get figgy.

Album, “The Figs”, The Figs, 2007 Valcour Records

Album, “What Keeps Me Up At Night”, The Figs 2008

Songs, “Jumbo” & “The Long Goodbye”, Marseille Figs, 2009 Figs of London


Cornmeal and Fig Cake with Pine Nuts - Recipes

From "Lidia's Italy In America"

Make the pastry cream: Whisk together the sugar, cornstarch, and salt in a medium pot. While whisking, pour in the milk. Set the pot over medium- low heat, and heat the mixture to just below boiling. Meanwhile, whisk the eggs in a large bowl. Remove the pot from heat, and pour the milk slowly into the eggs, whisking constantly, to temper the eggs. Pour the mixture back into the saucepan, and stir constantly over medium- low heat until the mixture thickens and just begins to simmer. Immediately scrape the mixture into a clean bowl. Let it cool slightly, then cover the surface of the pastry cream with plastic wrap. Refrigerate several hours or overnight, until chilled and thickened.

Make the cakes: Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Line a twelve-unit cupcake pan with paper liners. Sift together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt onto a piece of parchment.

Cream the butter and sugar in a mixer fitted with the paddle attachment on medium-high speed until light and fluffy, about 2 minutes. Crack in the eggs, one at a time, mixing well between additions. Stir in the olive oil, vanilla, and zest. Beat on high speed for 2 minutes, to lighten and smooth the batter. Mix in the flour in three additions on low speed, alternating with the orange juice, beginning and ending with the flour. Once everything has been added, beat the batter on high speed for about 20 seconds.

Divide the batter evenly among the cupcake liners. Bake until a toothpick inserted in the center of a cupcake comes out clean, about 20 to 25 minutes. Remove the cupcakes from pan, and cool completely on a wire rack.

1⁄2 cup sugar
4 teaspoons cornstarch
Pinch kosher salt
2 cups milk
2 large eggs

1 1⁄2 cups all-purpose flour
1 1⁄2 teaspoons baking powder
1⁄2 teaspoon baking soda
1⁄8 teaspoon kosher salt
6 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened
3⁄4 cup sugar
2 large eggs
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 tablespoon orange zest
3⁄4 cup freshly squeezed orange juice

2⁄3 cup light corn syrup
2 tablespoons dark rum
Pinch kosher salt
8 ounces semisweet chocolate, finely chopped

Make the glaze: Combine the corn syrup, rum, salt, and 2 tablespoons water in a small pot. Bring to a boil, and simmer until slightly thickened, about 2 minutes. Put the chopped chocolate in a heat- proof bowl, and pour the syrup over the chocolate. Stir until the glaze is smooth and shiny and all of the chocolate is melted. Let cool until thickened and just warm to the touch.

To assemble the cakes: Remove the cupcake liners from the cakes.
Split the cakes at the base of the cap with a serrated knife.

To finish: Invert one cake, and place the cake cap on a plate, cut side up. Spoon the pastry cream onto the cake top, then top with inverted cake bottom, like an upside-down mushroom. Spoon the hot chocolate glaze onto the base facing you, letting the glaze run down the sides of the cake, spooning on more if necessary. Repeat with the remaining filled cakes.


Fig and Almond Cake

I am sad to say that I am getting very close to the end of my fresh figs. The two trees that I pick from are just about finished and I may have just one small bowl left to pick in a day or so if the heavy rain storm last night hasn’t already knocked them off the trees. I canned 8 jars of a fig and apple combination yesterday that I use to make tarts with so next season when we return to Umbria I’ll have my filling ready to make tarts for our farmhouse guests. After making my canned tart filling, I had 8 nice sized figs leftover (after I gobbled up 4 raw), so I decided to throw together this easy fig cake recipe.

This cake is a thin one, more like a crustless tart really, though it is very moist. The cake uses minimal white flour, and uses mostly almond meal for the batter which is something I am in favor of. I enjoyed a slice of this cake for breakfast, but it would also be great served with a dollop of whipped cream for dessert.

I originally made this recipe using Italian prune plums and found it delicious, but since the original New York Times recipe used fresh figs, I decided I wanted to try that version as well and it really is the perfect combination of figs and almonds. Since this cake is so moist, if not enjoyed the day it is made it is best stored covered in plastic wrap in the refrigerator.


Semolina Bread with Fennel & Currants (and Pine Nuts)

When it comes to baking, I would make a terrific Boy Scout. I just do not like to be caught unprepared. 50-pound bag of flour? Check. At least 10 pounds of high-extraction flour in the refrigerator at all times? Of course. Five-year supply of panettone molds? Just got those in.

In other words, I stock up.

This is not about buying in bulk to save money, although that’s always nice. This is more like, I’m notoriously bad at planning ahead, so I plan way ahead. If that makes any sense at all.

How uncharacteristic of me, then, to allow my supply of dried currants to run low. But how truly characteristic of me to discover this right when it is time to add them to the dough. Let’s just say that mise en place is a concept that is not fully en place in this kitchen.

All of this is by way of explaining how pine nuts found their way into this heretofore nutless bread. I needed a replacement for a few lacking currants, and it seemed like pine nuts would fit in. In fact, they fit in so well that I’m giving them a permanent berth on the recipe’s ingredient list.

This bread has no sugar, but the fennel and currants lend a sweetness that makes this delicious for breakfast or after dinner. If you don’t want pine nuts (but I really think you do), add more currants to make up their weight. Or just omit them outright. Or replace some or all of the currants with more nuts. It’s all good.

Semolina Bread with Fennel, Currants & Pine Nuts

Yield: 1100 g (4 short baguettes)

  • Mix: 15 minutes
  • First fermentation: 1.5 hours
  • Divide/rest/shape: 30 minutes
  • Proof: 1.25 hours
  • Bake: 35 minutes

Desired dough temperature: 76F

Ingredients:

  • 220 g flour
  • 220 g semolina
  • 246 g water
  • 3.5 g (1 1/8 t.) instant yeast
  • 11 g (1 3/4t.) salt
  • 193 g ripe 100%-hydration sourdough starter
  • 22 g olive oil
  • 9 g (5 t.) whole fennel seeds
  • 110 g dried currants
  • 70 g pine nuts

  1. Combine the flour, semolina, water, salt, yeast, starter, and olive oil in the bowl of a stand mixer. Mix on low speed until just combined, about 4 – 5 minutes. Adjust the water to achieve a medium dough consistency, similar to a regular French bread dough.
  2. Mix on medium speed until the gluten has reached a medium level of development. This may take about 4 minutes, but will depend on your mixer.
  3. Add the fennel, currants and pine nuts and mix in low speed until just combined.
  4. Transfer the dough to a covered, lightly oiled container. Ferment at room temperature (72F – 76F) for 1.5 hours.
  5. Turn the dough onto a lightly floured counter and divide it into 4 pieces of about 260 g each. Preshape* each piece into a short cylinder, sprinkle lightly with flour, cover with a towel, and let them rest for 20 minutes.
  6. Shape* the dough into short baguettes (about 12 inches long) with pointed ends. Place them seam-side-up in a floured couche.

*A note about the shaping: I preshape into cylinders by flattening each piece of dough into a square, degassing gently. Then I fold the square into thirds like a letter, ending up with the seam on the bottom. After a bench rest, when it’s time to shape the baguette, I flip the cylinder over so that seam is up and degas gently again before starting to shape.

If you’re not familiar with how to shape a baguette, there are good written instructions at A Year in Bread. A slightly different technique is demonstrated by Danielle Forestier in this Julia Child video. (In the demo she only takes the dough to the thickness of a batard a baguette would be further rolled out to a thinner diameter.)


Watch the video: Συνταγή για μαρμελάδα σύκο που πετυχαίνει πάντα! ταχύτητα Χ2 - ηχωμαγειρέματα (May 2022).